Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

Revision as of 15:54, 16 October 2015 by Nawal Muazam (talk | contribs)
Jump to: navigation, search

Hepatocellular adenoma Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Hepatocellular adenoma from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

Diagnostic Study of Choice

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

X-ray

Echocardiography and Ultrasound

CT scan

MRI

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Hepatocellular adenoma MRI On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

CDC on Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

Hepatocellular adenoma MRI in the news

Blogs on Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

Directions to Hospitals Treating Hepatocellular adenoma

Risk calculators and risk factors for Hepatocellular adenoma MRI

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-In-Chief: Cafer Zorkun, M.D., Ph.D. [2]

Overview

MRI

  • On T1-weighted MR images, hepatocellular adenomas have been variously described as hyperintense, isointense, and hypointense lesions.
  • It has been reported that 47%–74% of hepatocellular adenomas are predominantly hyperintense relative to liver on T2-weighted images; this is due to prolonged T2 and is consistent with findings in other hepatic tumors.
  • Some lesions are hypointense and isointense on T2-weighted images.
  • Most lesions are heterogeneous, demonstrating a combination of hyper- and hypointensity on T2-weighted images relative to hemorrhage and necrosis.
  • Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced gradient-echo MR imaging, like dynamic CT, can be used to demonstrate early arterial enhancement that reflects the presence of subcapsular feeding vessels.
  • Adenomas usually do not show uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, resulting in decreased signal intensity on T2-weighted images.
  • After injection of a hepatocellular-specific contrast agent such as gadolinium benzyloxypropionictetraacetate (Gd-BOPTA) there is usually no substantial uptake.

References



Linked-in.jpg